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Thursday, August 17, 2017

Total Solar Eclipse Info & Safety

Monday, 21 August 2017


El Paso's Viewing Times

Partial Eclipse Begins (the Moon touches the Sun's edge): 10:23AM
Maximum Eclipse (Moon is closest to the center of the Sun): 11:47AM
Partial Eclipse Ends (the Moon leaves the Sun's edge): 1:15PM 


What is a total solar eclipse?

A total solar eclipse occurs when the disk of the moon appears to completely cover the disk of the sun in the sky. The fact that total solar eclipses occur at all is a quirk of cosmic geometry. The moon orbits an average of 239,000 miles (385,000 kilometers) from Earth — just the right distance to seem the same size in the sky as the much-larger sun. However, these heavenly bodies line up only about once every 18 months.
Outside the path of totality, skywatchers in the continental U.S. and other nearby areas will see a partial solar eclipse, in which the moon appears to take a bite out of the sun's disk. Two to five solar eclipses occur each year on average, but total solar eclipses happen just once every 18 months or so.  

What will I see during a total solar eclipse?

During a total solar eclipse, the disk of the moon blocks out the last sliver of light from the sun, and the sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, becomes visible. The corona is far from an indistinct haze; skywatchers report seeing great jets and ribbons of light, twisting and curling out into the sky.
"It brings people to tears," Rick Fienberg, a spokesperson for the American Astronomical Society (AAS), told Space.com of the experience. "It makes people's jaw drop."
During totality, the area inside the moon's shadow is cloaked in twilight — a very strange feeling to experience in the middle of the day. Just before and just after totality, observers can see this cloak of darkness moving toward them across the landscape, and then moving away.
These effects are not visible during a partial solar eclipse, so skywatchers are encouraged to see if they are inside the path of totality during the total eclipse. https://www.space.com/33797-total-solar-eclipse-2017-guide.html

 All reputable sellers nationwide are out of eclipse glasses and there are many recalls and counterfeits being sold online; however, here are some safe options below:





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